Wenima Wildlife Trail System
Wenima Village’s community trail system is incorporated into the natural environment of the Wenima Wildlife Area. The trail system is varied with many scenic views of the Little Colorado River featuring a large collection of Native American petroglyphs, with many present on the 300-plus acre development. Home-sites feature private entrance to trails and the entire community has ease of access to this trail system.
Edible Landscape
High landscape features will include many fruit and nut trees with various low growing herbs and vegetables integrated with the common area landscape.

Community Gardens
A separate area for organic community gardens with greenhouses is also planned. Wenima Community Gardens will allow for residents to become acquainted and have the opportunity to share and work together on a volunteer basis. A Farmer’s Market will be established in the summer to sell the community’s produce. Fruits, veggies, and fresh herbs are also available for home delivery by Wenima Concierge Service.

Park System
A landscaped park will co-exist with the trail system throughout the entire Wenima Village Community with gazebo areas planned for small group gatherings and family picnics. Several water feature areas are also planned and will incorporate enchantment alcoves and meditation areas.

Design
The award-winning firm, Circle West Architects--led by Peter Koliopoulos--will provide architectural and town-planning services for Wenima Village. Circle West is best known for Market Street at DC Ranch, Scottsdale, Arizona, a pedestrian friendly retail-commercial center defining the stylish, “Cowboy Contemporary.” Reflecting an array of textures, surfaces and colors, the Southwestern cattle ranch theme featured native stones quarried on site, concrete, rebar, steel, wood and zinc; and landscape materials native to the surrounding desert. Circle West’s simple goal, “to build a world that’s a better place for living,” is reflected through an environmentally friendly array of natural materials of stone, stucco, and steel within a neighborhood environment utilizing an organic expression of forms and materials.

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